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Tactile Ground Surface Indicators (TGSI's)

Interpretation of the Australian Standards AS1428.4

Contents

1. Why use CobbleTacTactiles.
2. What are Tactile Ground Surface Indicators (TGSIs).
3. Why are they available in different colours?
4. Why do we need to install TGSIs.
5. When to use Hazard or Warning TGSIs (Studded Tactiles).
6. When to use Directional TGSIs (Ribbed Tactiles).
7. Correct location of TGSI's
8. How do I install Tactiles

1. Why use CobbleTac Tactiles

a) CobbleTac Tactiles are R12 rated for anti-slip to ensure maximum safety.
b) provide a permanent solution for tactile guidance.
c) are UV stable.
d) conform with all of the Australian and New Zealand Standards
e) are easy to install
f) are available in 4 colours, to meet the luminance contrast requirements.

2. What are Tactile Ground Surface Indicators (TGSIs)

Put simply, TGSIs provide the vision impaired with a uniform system of tactile cues. This system has been designed to provide both directional and hazard warning cues.

When mobile, the vision impaired rely upon a "building line", which is the line created between a path and buildings, also known as a "sure line". On a shopping strip, this line is created by the physical presents of a shop front and the foot path. Along a normal suburban street, the sure line exists between a residence front fence and the pedestrian foot path.

However, what if the sure line is interrupted or navigation away from it out to a distant object, can not be made. For example, the vision impaired require tactile cues to find their way to tram and bus stops, pedestrian crossings and other areas which can not be managed with a sure line. In this case directional tactile cues are required.

Other tactile cues are required to warn the vision impaired of impending danger. For example: when there is a gradient such as a ramp, at the top and bottom of a stair case, at the edge of a railway platform and at pedestrian crossings. In this instance, the consequences of not providing tactile cues can be very hazardous for someone with vision impairment.

For these reasons many regulatory authorities around the world have established a system of providing consistent and meaningful cues to assist the vision impaired. TGSIs are available in two forms, either a ribbed format to provide "directional guidance" or in a studded format to provide a "hazard warning".

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3. Why are they available in different colours

Up to 90% of people with vision impairment still retain some sight. For this reason, luminance contrast can play an important role. People with vision impairment use luminance contrast as well as tactile cues as a means of guidance.

In some circumstances luminance contrast can also be used to define the path of travel. For example, on stairs, the use of contrasting stair nosings can highlight the exact location of each step.

The AS1428 – 2009 Design for access and mobility and the Australian / New Zealand Standards require a minimum luminance contrast of 30%. This contrast must be maintained in both wet and dry conditions.

CobbleTac Tactiles are available in 4 colours designed to provide appropriate luminance contrast across the entire spectrum of pedestrian surfaces.

4. Why do we need to install TGSIs

People with disabilities have the right of dignified, safe and independent access to buildings and other public facilities and services. As Australia's population continues to age it is estimated that the percentage of people with a degree of vision impairment will also grow significantly. The responsibility to cater for this segment of our population rests on those who design and build structures to ensure safe, easy access to public facilities.

The implementation of TGSI's provides the cues necessary to ensure independent and safe travel.

The use of Tactile Ground Surface Indicators, as well as other forms of tactile cues, in all new building environments, is regulated by:
a) The National Construction Code,
b) Australian and New Zealand Standards (AAS1428 – 2009 Design for access and mobility)
c) The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).

5. When to use Hazard or Warning TGSIs (Studded Tactiles)

It is imperative that the use of TGSIs be consistent to increase public understanding and to maximise their utilisation.

Warning TGSIs should be used to warn of Hazards such as:
a) life threatening hazards where serious falls may occur, such as at railway platforms, wharves, vehicular driveways and exits from car parks, etc, which intersect access paths.
b) To indicate that a point of importance has been reached such as the location of a bus sign or tram stop or the location of a change of direction on a pedestrian crossing island associated with a slip lane crossing.
c) At the top and bottom of stairways and ramps.
d) At pedestrian crossings to indicate the path of travel.

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6. When to use Directional TGSIs (Ribbed Tactiles)

Directional (Ribbed) TGSIs should be used as a means of providing guidance, such as:
a) at intersections where the point of entry to the road is more than 3m from the property line.
b) Across an open space from point A to point B, where there are no other tactile cues.
c) At mid-block crossings to indicate the position of crossings, bus or tram stops.
d) At intersections that incorporate slip-lane crossings to indicate the position of the kerb ramps.

7. Correct location of TGSI's

As people with vision impairment have been provided with training, any deviation from the standard layout can cause confusion and in some circumstances can be dangerous. The layout of TGSI's is critical in providing uniformity and correct interpretation.

In general the following principals apply:

7.1 External public access areas such as pedestrian walk ways and streetscapes

CobbleTac Tactiles are to be located at:
a) Pedestrian crossings, mid block crossings and islands associated with left turn slip lanes.
b) Public transport access points, eg: bus, tram or light rail stops.
c) Point of entry to a significant public facility, eg: railways station, public hospital, community health centre, sports or entertainment venue or public toilet.

7.1.1 Layout

7.1.1.1 Hazard Tactiles

Used to warn of impending danger and provide directional guidance.

    i) Hazard Tactiles must always be set perpendicular to the centre line of travel.
    ii) In the case of a pedestrian crossing: they must be set 600mm long across the total width of the ramp, set back 300mm from the projection of the line of kerb, along the set out centre line. Where the installation is required to be set on a skew with the kerb in order to maintain a perpendicular with the line of travel, then the leading edge must be set 300mm from the projection of the kerb.
    iii) When used as a change of direction along a pedestrian line of travel, such as on raised islands, the Hazard Tactile pad shall be 600mm x 600mm in dimension and perpendicular to at least 1 line of travel.
    iv) At bus stops, must be set 300mm back from the projection of the line of kerb and only 300mm long. In the case of a railway platform or wharf, the Tactiles must be 600mm long and set back 600mm from the edge of the platform.

7.1.1.2 Directional Tactiles

Used to provide directional orientation where there are insufficient tactile cues, eg: sure line or building line.

    i) Where directional indicators provide a continuous line of travel between two points in an open space, they shall be installed in parallel with the line of travel and shall be 300mm wide.
    ii) Where directional indicators need to be detected by a person approaching at an angle to the continuous path of travel, they shall be a minimum of 600mm wide and continuous until they reach the next tactile cue, eg: kerb ramp.

7.2⤴4Internal public access areas such as buildings, bus and railway interchanges, sports and entertainment facilities and meeting places

CobbleTac Tactiles are to be located at:

a) escalators and travelators
b) lifts
c) steps, stairs and ramps

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7.2.1 Layout

7.2.1.1 Hazard Tactiles

Used to warn of impending danger

    i) At steps stairways and ramps: 600mm long and must be set back 300 mm from the leading edge at the top and bottom of the stairs or at the change of gradient in the case of a ramp.
    ii) On open landings: 600mm long and across the entire width of the stairs leading to and from the landing.
    iii) On closed landings with no hand rails: 300mm long and across the entire width of the stairs leading to and from the landing.
    iv) TGSI's are not required on landings where both handrails are continuous and not broken by a doorway or similar.
    v) At escalators and travelators: 600mm long and must be set back 300mm from the hand rail.
    vi) When used in conjunction with directional tiles to give directional guidance in an open space the tile pad shall be 600mm x 600mm

7.2.1.2 Directional Tactiles

Used to give directional guidance in open spaces where there are otherwise insufficient tactile cues, eg: handrails or walls, etc.

    i) When used to provide directional guidance between points in an open space, eg; between the front entrance and reception, a toilet, a public telephone, or other facilities, they shall be placed 300mm wide and continuous along the line of travel.

8. How do I install Tactiles

It is a simple process however sometimes you can run into difficulties as not every tile layer is familiar with the requirements of the Australian / New Zealand Standards. Remember it is important to get it right and it must conform with the standards in order to provide nation wide uniformity. CobbleTac has a large network of experienced assessors and tile installers familiar with the standards and in many cases the work is cheaper done correctly the first time.

Our team of qualified personnel are able to quote direct from drawings and provide you with a supply and installation guarantee. We can also provide comprehensive installation instructions, appropriate adhesives and all the necessary tools to complete any Tactile installation. Please refer to the relevant section of the CTA web site or phone CTA direct on Mobile 0408 372 072

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